“Unsafe at Any Speed” — Even Standing Still

Posted on March 25th, 2015 by Dan Rampe

car on internet

Senator Proposes New Rules of the Road for Connected Cars That Leave Drivers Open to Invasions of Privacy and Cyberattack

When Ralph Nader’s Unsafe at Any Speed was published half a century ago accusing car manufacturers of resistance to spending money on safety, it caused a sea change in the auto industry. No. Not amphibious cars. But, it did lead to mandatory seat belt laws and the introduction of a host of other safety features.

Recently Sen. Ed Markey of Massachusetts released a report on the risks of cyberattack and loss of privacy posed by cars connected to the Internet. In a statement, he warned that “automakers haven’t done their part to protect us from cyber-attacks or privacy invasions [adding that even] as we are more connected than ever in our cars and trucks, our technology systems and data security remain largely unprotected.”

In her piece on washingtonpost.com, Andrea Peterson explores the many questions raised by the new Internet of Things smart cars and a few answers. The following has been excerpted from her piece and edited to fit our format. You may find the full article by clicking on this link.

Who’s foot is on the brake pedal?

Cybersecurity experts have long warned that cars’ electronic systems might be vulnerable to hackers, especially as auto-makers started building wireless connections to the outside world into vehicles. Researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek demonstrated how to take over the steering and brakes of a Ford Escape and a Toyota Prius using a laptop connected to the vehicles with a cable in 2013.

Many attack surfaces

Last year, the pair released a report detailing the wireless “attack surfaces” of a wide variety of vehicles on the market — things like Wi-Fi, keyless entry systems, and Bluetooth that might be targeted by a malicious hacker.

Inconsistent and haphazard

Nearly all cars on the market “include wireless technologies that could pose vulnerabilities to hacking or privacy intrusions,” according to Markey’s report…. Security measures to prevent remote access to a car’s electronic systems are “inconsistent and haphazard across all automobiles” and many manufacturers “did not seem to understand” the questions the legislator was asking. However, most manufacturers were either unaware or unable to report on previous hacking incidents.

“Cavalry” involved

Other groups have raised concerns about the security practices of auto-makers. I am the Cavalry, a group focused on where computer security intersects with physical safety, has urged vehicle manufacturers to adopt a five-star-style rating system for security best practices, akin to the ratings for traditional vehicle safety.

Your car is listening

The report also found that modern cars collect a significant amount of information on driving history and that drivers often cannot opt out of data collection without disabling features such as navigation. “A majority of automakers offer technologies that collect and wirelessly transmit driving history data to data centers, including third-party data centers, and most do not describe effective means to secure the data,” it said.

Markey calls for new regulatory standards

[Markey] calls for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to set new regulatory standards with input from the Federal Trade Commission. The standards should ensure that car’s wireless and data-collection features protect against hacking and security breaches, require that carmakers test their systems with penetration testing, require drivers be explicitly told about how data is collected and used, and give drivers a way to opt out of such features, the report argues.

Rules of the road enforced

“We need to work with the industry and cyber-security experts to establish clear rules of the road – not voluntary agreements – to ensure the safety and privacy of 21st-century American drivers,” Markey said.

ThreatMetrix builds trust on the Internet by offering market-leading advanced fraud prevention and frictionless context-based security solutions. These solutions authenticate consumer and workforce access to mission critical applications using real-time identity and access analytics that leverage the world’s largest trusted identity network.

ThreatMetrix secures enterprise applications against account takeover, payment fraud, fraudulent account registrations, malware, and data breaches. Underpinning the solution is the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network, which analyzes over 850 million monthly transactions and protects more than 210 million active user accounts across 3,000 customers and 15,000 websites.

The ThreatMetrix solution is deployed across a variety of industries, including financial services, enterprise, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government and insurance.

For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.

Join the cybersecurity conversation by visiting the ThreatMetrix blogFacebookLinkedIn and Twitter pages.

 

 

 

 

 

16 Million Mobile Devices Hit. Malware Infections Up 25 Percent.

Posted on March 24th, 2015 by Dan Rampe

Malware

Latest Study by French Telecom Equipment Company Alcatel-Lucent Shows 2014 Was a Banner Year for Bad Guys.

The Motive Security Labs division of Alcatel-Lucent recently published a report that found mobile device malware infections increased 25 percent compared with a 20 percent increase in 2013. Extrapolated out that comes to 16 million infected devices.

In his piece on zdnet.com, Leon Spencer highlights major findings from the report, officially titled, Motive Security Labs malware report – H2 2014. The following has been excerpted from Spencer’s zdnet.com story and edited to fit our format. You may find the full article by clicking on this link.

Mobile spyware big threat

[Six] of the mobile malware top 20 spyware…apps that are used to spy on the phone’s owner, and can track a phone’s location, monitor incoming and outgoing calls and text messages, monitor emails, and track a phone user’s web browsing.

Android devices now as popular with cybercriminals as Windows’ devices

[Android] devices have caught up with Windows laptops in terms of malware attack numbers, with infection rates between Android and Windows devices split 50/50.

iPhone and Blackberry not cybercriminals favorite target…yet

Less than 1 percent of infections came from iPhone and BlackBerry smartphones. However, new vulnerabilities, such as the “Find My iPhone” exploit discovered last year, have emerged in the past 12 months, showing that Apple is not immune from malware threats.

Owners not responsible

[The] growth in malware infections has been aided by mobile device owners not taking “proper” device security precautions. A recent Motive Security Labs survey found that 65 percent of the security platform subscribers expected their service provider to protect both their mobile and home devices.

Who’d ‘ve “thunk” it?

The report also found that, somewhat counter-intuitively, consumers who avoid shopping online out of fear that their credit or debit card information may be stolen may, in fact, be exposing themselves to greater risk. A spate of retail payment systems security breaches in 2014 showed that malware infections are more likely to be found on cash registers or point-of-sale terminals, rather than on online store payment portals.

Increase in DDoS

[Researchers] found that there was an increase in distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks using network infrastructure components such as home routers, DSL modems, cable modems, mobile Wi-Fi hotspots, DNS servers, and NTP servers.

Additionally, the first DDOS attacks launched from mobile phones took place, suggesting how so-called “hacktivism” movements against the mobile infrastructure might be launched in the future….

ThreatMetrix builds trust on the Internet by offering market-leading advanced fraud prevention and frictionless context-based security solutions. These solutions authenticate consumer and workforce access to mission critical applications using real-time identity and access analytics that leverage the world’s largest trusted identity network.

ThreatMetrix secures enterprise applications against account takeover, payment fraud, fraudulent account registrations, malware, and data breaches. Underpinning the solution is the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network, which analyzes over 850 million monthly transactions and protects more than 210 million active user accounts across 3,000 customers and 15,000 websites.

The ThreatMetrix solution is deployed across a variety of industries, including financial services, enterprise, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government and insurance.

For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.

Join the cybersecurity conversation by visiting the ThreatMetrix blogFacebookLinkedIn and Twitter pages.

 

 

Browser Beware

Posted on March 23rd, 2015 by Dan Rampe

Browsers

Ponemon Survey of 645 Information Tech Companies Says Half of All Malware Was the Result of Web Browsers That Weren’t Secure

Less than a third of respondents thought major browsers had “effective security tools for blocking web-borne malware.” And, close to 70 percent of IT professionals thought browser-borne malware was getting worse and was “a more significant threat today than [just] 12 months ago.” These were among the observations brought to light in the Ponemon study as reported by Cory Bennett on thehill.com. The following has been excerpted from Bennett’s article and edited to fit our format. You may find his full article by clicking on this link.

An unsettling thought

Over three quarters [of IT professionals] thought it was certain or very likely their organization had an undetected infiltration from browser-based malware.

Google hunting for bugs

[Google is taking …steps to root out more bugs in its Chrome browser, which recently became the second-most popular browser behind Microsoft’s Internet Explorer.

The [company] said it [would] start giving no-strings-attached grants to independent researchers to suss out flaws in its products, including Chrome. The company will post vulnerabilities they are looking to eradicate and will dole out up to $3,133.70 to researchers willing to take a shot at it.

The hunt gets harder

Since 2010, Google has rewarded researchers if they discovered flaws in Google products and services. The company said it’s adding the new grant program because these vulnerabilities are increasingly difficult to find, after years of independent researchers and Google’s in-house team working on the issue.

“Of course, that’s good news, but it can also be discouraging when researchers invest their time and struggle to find issues,” said Google security engineer Eduardo Vela Nava.

Chrome chief beneficiary

Chrome has benefited from these rewards as much, if not more, than any other product, Nava said. In 2014, more than half of the Chrome bugs discovered by outside researchers were found in beta versions of the browser.

ThreatMetrix builds trust on the Internet by offering market-leading advanced fraud prevention and frictionless context-based security solutions. These solutions authenticate consumer and workforce access to mission critical applications using real-time identity and access analytics that leverage the world’s largest trusted identity network.

ThreatMetrix secures enterprise applications against account takeover, payment fraud, fraudulent account registrations, malware, and data breaches. Underpinning the solution is the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network, which analyzes over 850 million monthly transactions and protects more than 210 million active user accounts across 3,000 customers and 15,000 websites.

The ThreatMetrix solution is deployed across a variety of industries, including financial services, enterprise, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government and insurance.

For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.

Join the cybersecurity conversation by visiting the ThreatMetrix blogFacebookLinkedIn and Twitter pages.

 

 

 

 

Have EMV Terminals? American Express Has a Hundred Simoleons for You.

Posted on March 9th, 2015 by Dan Rampe

American Express

American Express Rolls Out a “Small Merchant EMV Assistance Program” to Help Speed up Adoption of EMV Payments

Have to clear up something for anyone who’s not exactly sure what simoleons are. Okay they’re not a lost tribe of South Sea islanders discovered by Tim Cook using Google Earth who now do their tweeting on iPhones instead of conch shells. Also, they’re not anything you’d top with chipotle sauce – unless you wanted to put your money where your mouth is.

Simoleons are simply bucks, clams, ducats, greenbacks, smackers, i.e., dollars. And, as part of its Small Merchant EMV Assistance Program, American Express will give one hundred of those dollars to any U.S. merchant who’s already adopted EMV terminals. We should mention this is a one time only offer.

In her story on paymentweek.com, Melanie Macinas writes additional facets of American Express’s $10 million campaign to speed up the adoption of EMV payment terminals. The following has been excerpted from her article and edited to fit our format. You may find the full article by clicking on this link.

Educational resources

Small merchants will also receive educational resources on EMV via email, telephone hotline, and website.

EMV ambassadors

American Express Fraud Squad ambassadors will also visit Atlanta, Houston, Miami, and New York City to personally meet with small merchants and discuss with them the advantages of EMV.

Many small merchants still unaware of EMV

[Anré Williams, President, Global Merchant Services, American Express, notes,

“Unfortunately, many small merchants do not know about EMV or what they need to do to take advantage of it. We created the Small Merchant EMV Assistance Program to help them. By providing financial and educational assistance, we hope small merchants more quickly adopt EMV so they can ensure their customers feel safe when shopping at their stores.”

ThreatMetrix builds trust on the Internet by offering market-leading advanced fraud prevention and frictionless context-based security solutions leveraging a global shared digital identity network and real time customer driven analytics platform.  These solutions help customers differentiate between trusted users and potential fraud resulting in reduced friction, incremental revenue and lower fraud and operational costs.

ThreatMetrix secures customers against account takeover, payment fraud, fraudulent account registrations resulting from malware, and data breaches. Underpinning the solution is the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network, which analyzes over one billion monthly transactions and protects more than 250 million active user accounts across 3,000 customers and 15,000 websites and mobile applications. ThreatMetrix is deployed by industry leaders across financial services, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government and insurance.

For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.

Join the cybersecurity conversation by visiting the ThreatMetrix blogFacebookLinkedIn and Twitter pages.

 

 

 

ThreatMetrix Labs Report Covers the Fish That Hooks People

Posted on March 5th, 2015 by Dan Rampe

Labs-Header

Superfish Adware Acting as “Man-In-The-Browser” Business and Banking Malware Is Outlined in the Latest ThreatMetrix Labs Report

Not familiar with Superfish? Ask any buyer of a Lenovo laptop purchased between October and December 2014 whose computer came preinstalled with the adware. But don’t think you’re going to hear kudos.

“Superfish Adware – A Closer Look”

Comparing Superfish and similar adware to “man-in-the-browser” (MitB) banking Trojans, the ThreatMetrix Labs report, “Superfish Adware – A Closer Look,” details the nature and behavior of this software. It also details Superfish’s HTML injection through browser add-ons and the type of sensitive information this injection allows the injected Javascript to access.

Komodia’s library vulnerable

The report also goes into issues associated with Superfish and other adware tools that use Komodia’s library for ad injection installing a Certificate Authority (CA) into users’ browsers. Protected only by easily-obtained, weak passwords, it’s no trouble at all for cybercriminals to create fake, legitimate-looking website certificates.

Andreas Baumhof, ThreatMetrix’s CTO, on the increasing adware threat

“Data from the ThreatMetrix Global Trust Intelligence Network shows that the Superfish Adware has been an increasing threat since October 2014. While this isn’t a new threat, its recent exposure has left many businesses and consumers questioning what they should know about its threats and how to protect against it. Since it has been around for some time and ThreatMetrix has long had capabilities to detect these kinds of threats, we provide technical details surrounding Superfish and its implications.”

A Javascript injection of Superfish

Depending on the page accessed, the Javascript injected by Superfish has full access to a wide range of sensitive information. For example, the ThreatMetrix Labs report outlines the information that can be accessed by this Javascript code when a user visits a website, including cookies, local storage information, any Document Object Model (DOM) element of the page, user input (such as form field data) and any events that are fired during the session (such as submission of a login form).

ThreatMetrix’s honeypot detects malware strains

ThreatMetrix provides a malware detection service (a “honeypot”) that allows its customers to detect the presence of malware strains like Superfish in real time without any interference in their customers’ journeys. This information is fully integrated into the analysis by the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network (The Network).

Notes Baumhof about the honeypot

“Whenever a strain of malware like Superfish grows this rapidly, online businesses and banks struggle to protect their customers against its threats – such as compromised sensitive information – without adding friction to the user experience. ThreatMetrix’s honeypot detection techniques help businesses detect unauthorized webpage modification within a user’s browser as part of the user’s full risk assessment, all without any added steps to the customer journey.”

Authenticating customers in real-time

ThreatMetrix authenticates customer transactions using real-time identity and access analytics that leverage the power of the world’s largest shared intelligence network. The ThreatMetrix solution already protects leading online businesses and financial institutions against account takeover, payment fraud, and fraudulent account registrations as a result of stolen credentials obtained from malware, social engineering, phishing and data breaches.

The public ThreatMetrix Labs report can be downloaded here.

ThreatMetrix builds trust on the Internet by offering market-leading advanced fraud prevention and frictionless context-based security solutions leveraging a global shared digital identity network and real time customer driven analytics platform.  These solutions help customers differentiate between trusted users and potential fraud resulting in reduced friction, incremental revenue and lower fraud and operational costs.

ThreatMetrix secures customers against account takeover, payment fraud, fraudulent account registrations resulting from malware, and data breaches. Underpinning the solution is the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network, which analyzes over one billion monthly transactions and protects more than 250 million active user accounts across 3,000 customers and 15,000 websites and mobile applications. ThreatMetrix is deployed by industry leaders across financial services, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government and insurance.

For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.

Join the cybersecurity conversation by visiting the ThreatMetrix blogFacebookLinkedIn and Twitter pages.

 

Sandpiper: An Eagle When It Comes to Fighting Cybercrime

Posted on February 27th, 2015 by Dan Rampe

Europol

EC3 Supports 18-Month EU-Funded “Project Sandpiper” to Stop Payment Card Fraud in Its Tracks

The latest statistics published by the European Central Bank reveal that card-not-present (CNP) fraud is on the rise accounting for 60% of all fraud losses on cards issued in the European Union. To address the problem, Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre (EC3) has launched several investigations.

Project Sandpiper

Initiated by UK authorities and supported by Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre (EC3), Project Sandpiper took out after the bad guys. The score after eighteen months: 59 arrests; 32 prosecutions; 17 convictions; 52,812 compromised card numbers recovered; £23 million ($35 million) estimated savings to the banking industry; and the disruption of 5 organized crime groups misusing electronic payments mainly in overseas destinations.

Troels Oerting, head of EC3

An article on eurasiareview.com (link to article) quotes the former head of the European Cybercrime Centre, Troels Oerting, who said, “The criminal networks involved in this sophisticated electronic payment crime have been taken down as a result of many months of hard work by police officers and prosecutors in the European Union. Through the international cooperation of law enforcement authorities, the European Commission and Europol, as well as cooperation with the financial industry, European customers’ payment transactions are safer. We continue our fight against this crime. The criminals continue to develop new methods for stealing our identities, money and ideas online, and we have to continue and further develop operations like Sandpiper and Skynet. [Skynet is the codename of a new EU-funded project. Just launched, it focuses on international cooperation to combat online CNP fraud. Six EU Member States are involved.]”

A joint EU effort

According to the eurasiareview.com story, Europol’s information and analysis systems are used to exchange and cross-check the intelligence received from member states.

ThreatMetrix builds trust on the Internet by offering market-leading advanced fraud prevention and frictionless context-based security solutions. These solutions authenticate consumer and workforce access to mission critical applications using real-time identity and access analytics that leverage the world’s largest trusted identity network.

ThreatMetrix secures enterprise applications against account takeover, payment fraud, fraudulent account registrations, malware, and data breaches. Underpinning the solution is the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network, which analyzes over 850 million monthly transactions and protects more than 210 million active user accounts across 3,000 customers and 15,000 websites.

The ThreatMetrix solution is deployed across a variety of industries, including financial services, enterprise, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government and insurance.

For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.

Join the cybersecurity conversation by visiting the ThreatMetrix blogFacebookLinkedIn and Twitter pages.

 

 

 

 

What’s Happening with Mobile Device Payments Is Criminal

Posted on February 23rd, 2015 by Dan Rampe

Mobile Devices

Mobile Device Fraud Makes Up a Disproportionate Share of the $6 Billion Fraud Costs Merchants and Card Issuers in the U.S. Each Year

Forrester Research says mobile payments accounted for $52 billion worth of U.S. transactions in 2014, up from $32 billion in 2013. And this year that number is expected to hit $67 billion.

A LexisNexis survey of 1,100 companies found that while mobile payments account for 14 percent of transactions among merchants, they make up 21 percent of fraud cases. In her story on bloomberg.com, Olga Kharif details how cyberthieves have continued to shift their focus to mobile devices. The following has been excerpted from her piece and edited to fit our format. You may find her complete article by clicking on this link.

More mobile fraud than on PCs

“We certainly see a surge in mobile payment attacks,” says Tomer Barel, chief risk officer at PayPal, who says his company deals with more cases of fraud on mobile devices than on PCs. “There are many more avenues for fraudsters to try.”

Every dollar of mobile fraud costs merchants $3.34

Each dollar worth of misbegotten mobile payments winds up costing a fooled merchant $3.34. That’s slightly more than the cost of a fraudulent credit card swipe or mail order, 27 percent more than a similar payment made from a PC.

Merchants aren’t equipped to handle mobile fraud

Along with the cost of lost merchandise, the total includes investigation of the fraud. That’s tougher on phones than on PCs, because many businesses aren’t equipped to track mobile devices’ unique identifiers such as IP addresses. Stores often don’t catch when a card issued in Los Angeles is used for a mobile order from Mexico, says Aaron Press, director of e-commerce and payments at LexisNexis Risk Solutions. “It’s kind of a wake-up call,” he says.

Lower-tech fraud

Some mobile fraud remains low-tech. Last year, the Better Business Bureau warned consumers about a scam in which people posted absurdly cheap offers for used cars online, then tricked interested buyers into wiring funds through a phony version of Google Wallet.

Higher-tech fraud

Other frauds are more technical, such as the hackers who found a bug in a Chilean public transportation app that let them top off their travel credits for free.

The weak link

Like the brief flurry of duplicate charges that accompanied Apple Pay’s debut in October, such glitches highlight the vulnerability inherent in a system that requires banks, card networks, and software makers to keep pace with thieves. “If you don’t make the proper investment, they’ll be attracted to the weakest link,” says PayPal’s Barel.

Biometrics may stop some cybercriminals

Smartphone operating systems, at least, are tougher to infiltrate than those of PCs. Phones with biometric sensors can also make a person’s identity tougher to steal. Mobile payment service LoopPay says it’s adding support for biometric features such as Apple’s fingerprint reader, despite hackers’ claims that they can fool the iPhone’s sensor. Rival CurrentC says it’s considering similar measures….

“There’s no perfect system,” says Will Graylin, chief executive officer of LoopPay. “It’s always a game of cat and mouse.”

ThreatMetrix builds trust on the Internet by offering market-leading advanced fraud prevention and frictionless context-based security solutions. These solutions authenticate consumer and workforce access to mission critical applications using real-time identity and access analytics that leverage the world’s largest trusted identity network.

ThreatMetrix secures enterprise applications against account takeover, payment fraud, fraudulent account registrations, malware, and data breaches. Underpinning the solution is the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network, which analyzes over 850 million monthly transactions and protects more than 210 million active user accounts across 3,000 customers and 15,000 websites.

The ThreatMetrix solution is deployed across a variety of industries, including financial services, enterprise, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government and insurance.

For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.

Join the cybersecurity conversation by visiting the ThreatMetrix blogFacebookLinkedIn and Twitter pages.

 

 

ThreatMetrix Named to OnCloud’s “Top 100” and CEO Tapped as Keynote for OnCloud 2015 Summit

Posted on February 17th, 2015 by Dan Rampe

Standard-Header-Reed

A Panelist at the Annual AlwaysOn Summit, ThreatMetrix CEO Reed Taussig Will Deliver His Keynote Speech on Security in the Cloud

AlwaysOn’s OnCloud 2015 Summit will take place at the College of San Mateo (San Mateo, CA) on February 26, 2015. The Summit brings together “the best and the brightest” including top entrepreneurs, investors, and corporate players in the business-to-business application and cloud infrastructure space to discuss and debate the future of cloud technology.

Reed Taussig’s keynote

Titled “Global Shared Intelligence: The Best Solution to Combat Cybercrime,” Taussig’s keynote presentation will take place at 11:30 a.m. PST. Over the course of his speech, he’ll be providing an overview of the current cybercrime landscape.

Using examples from ThreatMetrix’s TrustDefender Cybercrime Protection Platform, Taussig will show how ThreatMetrix discovered and defeated organized crime rings by leveraging the power of the ThreatMetrix Global Trust Intelligence Network (The Network).

A distinguished panel

Taussig will also be participating in a panel alongside host Aditya Singh, partner at Foundation Capital and co-panelist Barmak Meftah, president and CEO at AlienVault. The subject of the discussion will be “The New Frontier in Cloud Infrastructure” and will take place at 11:45 a.m. PST.

ThreatMetrix’s CEO on global shared intelligence

“The global cybercrime landscape is constantly evolving to include new, more sophisticated threats and the only way to combat these threats is through collective intelligence,” said Taussig. “This isn’t a threat any business or consumer can fight alone. It requires a collective network that leverages data from across a global information base. I’m honored to share what ThreatMetrix has accomplished in the fight against cybercrime by leveraging global shared intelligence with this year’s OnCloud attendees. The OnCloud summit hosts key industry players who can help to make shared intelligence an industry standard.”

ThreatMetrix on OnCloud’s Top 100 private companies list

The annual list honors companies in the B2B applications, management tools, security and infrastructure sectors that are rising to the challenge of bringing the world’s businesses and enterprises into the cloud. This year’s OnCloud 100 companies were selected based on a set of five criteria: innovation, market potential, commercialization, stakeholder value and media buzz. A full list of the OnCloud Top 100 winners is available here.

Validation of our continued innovation

“The OnCloud Top 100 honors companies that take big data and create useful, actionable intelligence from it to make high-powered decisions,” said Taussig. “In the case of ThreatMetrix and The Network, such decisions have the power to stop cybercriminals in real time. ThreatMetrix leverages data from the largest shared intelligence network available to make an immediate and educated decision to differentiate between authentic and fraudulent transactions. Being named to OnCloud’s Top 100 private companies list serves as validation of our continued innovation in advanced fraud prevention and context-based authentication.”

For more information on the OnCloud 2015 summit, click here.

ThreatMetrix has garnered a host of awards. Following are some of the most recent:

  • The Channel Company’s CRN 100 Coolest Cloud Computing Vendors of 2015
  • Gold Stevie in New Product or Service of the Year – Security Solution category and a Silver in the Most Innovative Tech Company of the Year – Computer Software category.
  • Gold for “Innovative Company of the Year” and for “Integrated Security (Software) Innovation” at the 2014 Golden Bridge Business Awards
  • CIOReview100 for the “100 Most Promising Technology Companies in the U.S.”
  • Best in Biz Awards 2014 International Silver for “Enterprise Product of the Year – Software”
  • The AlwaysOn Global 250 Top Private Companies in the “B2B Cloud and Infrastructure” category
  • Lead411’s 2014 “Hottest Companies in Silicon Valley” list
  • Products Guide (NPG) Hot Companies and Best Product Award Winner for the “Best Products and Services – Information Security and Risk Management” category and also in the “Best Products and Services – Security Software” category.
  • Judges Choice for Best Overall Fraud/Security Solution at the 2014 CardNotPresent.com (CNP) Awards for the ThreatMetrix TrustDefender Cybercrime Protection Platform
  • A 2014 Global Excellence Award for Most Innovative Company of the Year (Security)
  • 2014 Cyber Defense Magazine Award Winner in 2 Categories: Most Innovative Anti-Malware Appliances Solution & Best Product Network Access Control Solution

ThreatMetrix builds trust on the Internet by offering market-leading advanced fraud prevention and frictionless context-based security solutions. These solutions authenticate consumer and workforce access to mission critical applications using real-time identity and access analytics that leverage the world’s largest trusted identity network.

ThreatMetrix secures enterprise applications against account takeover, payment fraud, fraudulent account registrations resulting from malware, and data breaches. Underpinning the solution is the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network, which analyzes over 850 million monthly transactions and protects more than 210 million active user accounts across 3,000 customers and 15,000 websites and mobile applications.

The ThreatMetrix solution is deployed across a variety of industries, including financial services, enterprise, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government and insurance.

For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.

Join the cybersecurity conversation by visiting the ThreatMetrix blogFacebookLinkedIn and Twitter pages.

ThreatMetrix Named to OnCloud Top 100 Private Companies and CEO to Speak at OnCloud 2015 Summit

Posted on February 17th, 2015 by Dan Rampe

Standard-Header-Reed

CEO Reed Taussig to Provide Keynote on Security in the Cloud and Participate as a Panelist at Annual AlwaysOn Summit

San Jose, CA – February 17, 2015 – ThreatMetrix®, the fastest-growing provider of context-based security and advanced fraud prevention solutions, today announced its CEO, Reed Taussig, will serve as a keynote speaker and participate in a panel at AlwaysOn’s OnCloud 2015 Summit in San Mateo, Calif. on Feb. 26.

Hosted annually in the heart of Silicon Valley at the College of San Mateo, OnCloud brings together the brightest minds and top entrepreneurs, investors, and corporate players in the business-to-business application and cloud infrastructure space to discuss and debate the future of cloud technology.

Taussig’s keynote presentation on security in the cloud, entitled, “Global Shared Intelligence: The Best Solution to Combat Cybercrime,” will take place at 11:30 a.m. PST. During this presentation, he will provide an overview of the current cybercrime landscape, citing examples from ThreatMetrix’s comprehensive solution, the ThreatMetrix TrustDefender™ Cybercrime Protection Platform, which has been successful in discovering and defeating organized crime rings by leveraging the power of the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network (The Network). Taussig will also participate in a panel alongside host Aditya Singh, partner at Foundation Capital and co-panelist Barmak Meftah, president and CEO at AlienVault, entitled, “The New Frontier in Cloud Infrastructure,” at 11:45 a.m. PST.

“The global cybercrime landscape is constantly evolving to include new, more sophisticated threats and the only way to combat these threats is through collective intelligence,” said Taussig. “This isn’t a threat any business or consumer can fight alone. It requires a collective network that leverages data from across a global information base. I’m honored to share what ThreatMetrix has accomplished in the fight against cybercrime by leveraging global shared intelligence with this year’s OnCloud attendees. The OnCloud summit hosts key industry players who can help to make shared intelligence an industry standard.”

ThreatMetrix was also recently included in the 2015 OnCloud Top 100 private companies list. The annual list honors companies in the B2B applications, management tools, security and infrastructure sectors that are rising to the challenge of bringing the world’s businesses and enterprises into the cloud. This year’s OnCloud 100 companies were selected based on a set of five criteria: innovation, market potential, commercialization, stakeholder value and media buzz. A full list of the OnCloud Top 100 winners is available here.

“The OnCloud Top 100 honors companies that take big data and create useful, actionable intelligence from it to make high-powered decisions,” said Taussig. “In the case of ThreatMetrix and The Network, such decisions have the power to stop cybercriminals in real time. ThreatMetrix leverages data from the largest shared intelligence network available to make immediate and educated decisions to differentiate between authentic and fraudulent transactions. Being named to OnCloud’s Top 100 private companies list serves as validation of our continued innovation in advanced fraud prevention and context-based authentication.”

For more information on the OnCloud 2015 summit, click here.

ThreatMetrix Resources

About ThreatMetrix

ThreatMetrix builds trust on the Internet by offering market-leading advanced fraud prevention and frictionless context-based security solutions. These solutions authenticate consumer and workforce access to mission critical applications using real-time identity and access analytics that leverage the world’s largest trusted identity network.

ThreatMetrix secures enterprise applications against account takeover, payment fraud, fraudulent account registrations resulting from malware, and data breaches. Underpinning the solution is the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network, which analyzes over 850 million monthly transactions and protects more than 210 million active user accounts across 3,000 customers and 15,000 websites and mobile applications.

The ThreatMetrix solution is deployed across a variety of industries, including financial services, enterprise, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government and insurance.

For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.

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Dan Rampe
ThreatMetrix
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Email: drampe@threatmetrix.com

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White House Cybersecurity Summit Decisions Aligned with ThreatMetrix Solutions

Posted on February 16th, 2015 by Dan Rampe

Obama

President Calls for Threat Information Sharing and Right to Privacy

In the wake of the White House Cybersecurity Summit held at Stanford University last week, Alisdair Faulkner, chief products officer, ThreatMetrix® wrote:

In light of President Obama’s visit to Silicon Valley, now is a better time than ever to address online security and privacy. Collecting an unreasonable amount of personal information will lead to a “Privacy Pearl Harbor.”

How much information collection is too much?

Threat intelligence sharing is necessary but only to a certain extent – businesses must make sure that reasonable security is not an unreasonable privacy invasion. There needs to be a reasonable amount of digital identity verification such as verifying one’s location or phone number when using a banking app. However, some businesses, including ride sharing services and major banks, have access to information about your entire location and activity history each time you use the app. With so much information stored on users’ mobile devices and in specific mobile apps, this often leads to an unreasonable privacy invasion beyond what is necessary for security measures. Instead, the recent influx of data breaches and privacy concerns calls for industry-wide authentication guidelines that do not compromise privacy.

Anonymized shared intelligence: authentication and privacy

To maintain a balance between privacy and security, businesses should leverage anonymized shared intelligence, behavior-based identity proofing and context-based authentication. At a minimum, industries operating online should self-enforce standards for controlling access to customer data from both insider and outsider theft without invading privacy.

Protecting customer and corporate identities

In addition to balancing privacy and security, businesses need to focus on protecting data in use in addition to data at rest. Data in use refers to customer or corporate identities that are used following a data breach without the individual’s knowledge. A key requirement for data protection is for businesses to ensure personally identifiable information is screened against unauthorized use prior to being processed. This can be done through device identification, malware detection and anonymized trust federation.

For more on preserving privacy while maintaining security, see:

ThreatMetrix Shares Strategies for Walking the Tightrope Between Consumer Online Privacy and Security

ThreatMetrix Shares Strategies for Businesses to Protect Identities in Use in Support of Data Privacy Day

At summit President acknowledges challenge of info sharing vs. privacy

In her story on techcrunch.com, Sarah Buhr discusses the primary themes that emerged from the President’s call for closer cooperation between government and the private sector. The following has been excerpted from her piece and edited to fit our format. You may find the complete article by clicking on this link.

A new sheriff in town

While pushing for that collaboration, he admitted it would be a challenge to both keep up with cyber threats and protect American’s right to privacy at the same time. “Protecting the American people while making sure government is not abusing its capabilities is hard. The cyberworld is sort of the Wild Wild West and to some degree we are asked to be the sheriff…”

President signs Executive Order

[Obama] signed an Executive Order….. One of those provisions encourages information sharing and analysis organizations (ISAOs), which would serve as points of contact for information sharing between the government and the private sector.

The order added the Department of Homeland Security to the list of government organizations that would be able to approve the sharing of classified information and ensure that proper information is shared between entities.

The Snowden effect

The big question here is whether the private sector will be willing to offer this information. Many companies are still reeling from Edward Snowden’s revelations that they were handing over consumer information to the U.S. government and have since taken measures to encrypt data, even from themselves.

Constructing a cathedral

Obama acknowledged the challenge to protect American citizens from cyber threats, but at the same time protect their right to privacy. [He] likened the process of technological development to building a cathedral.

“[T]hat cathedral will not just be about technology but about the values we have embedded in this system. It will be about privacy and security and about connection. A magnificent cathedral and we’re all going to be a part of that.”

ThreatMetrix builds trust on the Internet by offering market-leading advanced fraud prevention and frictionless context-based security solutions. These solutions authenticate consumer and workforce access to mission critical applications using real-time identity and access analytics that leverage the world’s largest trusted identity network.

ThreatMetrix secures enterprise applications against account takeover, payment fraud, fraudulent account registrations, malware, and data breaches. Underpinning the solution is the ThreatMetrix® Global Trust Intelligence Network, which analyzes over 850 million monthly transactions and protects more than 210 million active user accounts across 3,000 customers and 15,000 websites.

The ThreatMetrix solution is deployed across a variety of industries, including financial services, enterprise, e-commerce, payments, social networks, government and insurance.

For more information, visit www.threatmetrix.com or call 1-408-200-5755.

Join the cybersecurity conversation by visiting the ThreatMetrix blogFacebookLinkedIn and Twitter pages.